Category Archives: books

Ghost Touch by LA Dragoni

For fifteen minutes each night a portal opens in Tamara’s
barn and a horde of ghosts spills into her yard. She and Dex work together to
find a way to help Cal and the thousands of spirits stuck in the void to cross
over. When she learns she has the ghost touch—the ability to touch the ghosts
as if they were corporeal—and she accidentally helps a little boy cross, she
believes it might be possible. But not all the spirits play nice and when they
learn they can sip energy from her ghost touch, they become greedy putting her
life at risk.
Each time Cal has to pull her from the mass of ghosts, her
touch restores him more and more until he is at danger of being stuck on
earth—forever, which is very enticing to Tamara the better she knows him. Will
she and Dex figure out how to help the spirits cross and if they do, will she
be able to let Cal go?
Available in ebook, and audiobook
from Amazon, and now available in print!
Also available on Barnes
and Noble
, Kobo,
iTunes, and other
e-tailers.
Excerpt:
Tamara rubbed her hands together then held them
toward the fire. The air had an extra chill to it. “Hurry up, they should be
here soon.”
She’d barely finished speaking when bright light
burst through the barn. Tamara spun back around. “Dex!”
She shielded her eyes with a hand searching for
Dex’s familiar silhouette, but couldn’t make him out in the chaos of ghosts
streaming from within the building.
“Dex!” she shouted again, leaping forward and running
toward the door. A stabbing pain of cold sliced through her upper arm when she
knocked against the ghost with the shovel in his hand. He stopped to stare at
her with a surprised expression on his face. She pushed forward, ignoring the
increasing pain as she jostled up against the ghosts.
A knot of ghosts hunkered together where she last
saw Dexter. She pushed through them, her warm touch surprising enough to make
them jump back. Dex lay crumpled in a quivering ball at the center of the
group. Tamara kneeled beside him and clutched his shoulders.
“Dex! Are you okay?” He didn’t respond, just
rocked to and fro, mumbling incoherent words. She shouted. “Dex! Can you hear
me?”
His gaze finally lifted, a wary look colored with
terror.
“Oh my God.” Tamara wrapped her arms around him.
His body was ice cold. She pressed as much of herself against him as she could
and buried her face in his hair. “I gotcha. You’ll be okay.”
Then she became aware of an ache worming through
her muscles and realized hands pawed at her, clutched her, and were trying to
pull her away. She raised a furious glare at the eager crowd of ghouls and
snarled. “Stop! Leave us alone.”
However, hunger showed in the eyes of those who’d
been dead a short enough time to still have them. Actions became more insistent
and then combative. The group shoved and swayed until she worried she’d be
crushed beneath them when they fell. She kept her arms wrapped around Dex,
hoping to keep the spirits off him, but many simply reached through him to get
to her. He shuddered violently and had grown quiet.
Each individual touch drained her of warmth and
energy, yet they continued to grope at her arms and back, tug on her hair and
clothing. She grew weaker and weaker until the edges of her vision dimmed and
she could barely feel the boy she was trying to protect. Just before she passed
out, a roar penetrated her frozen mind and she sensed more than saw the crowd
spring away. But she was already too far gone and lost consciousness just as
lukewarm hands gripped her upper arms.
Reviews:
The writing’s terrific,
the storyline compelling. Truth be told, I rushed to the end to find out who
Tamara would end up with.
-Stuart R. West

About the author: LA
Dragoni
isn’t too particular about who falls in love or where they fall in
love. She simply considers it her job to capture the story about their love.
Whether it’s paranormal, mythical, or time travel, LA will be there to divine
their story for you. She lives in Central Oregon with her husband and children,
but haunts ghost towns and cemeteries up and down the west, in search of the
next adventure to sift through her storytelling brain. Follow LA on Facebook and Twitter. Subscribe to her mailing list and learn more about LA and
her work at www.ladragoni.com

Prologues and Epilogues: Yes or No

rndrbnlogo

 

 

This month’s topic is prologues and epilogues: yes or no, and can you have one without the other — or, more properly, should you have either or both.

I have never written either a prologue or an epilogue — at least, I’ve never published a book with a part so-labelled, so I decided to check out my stack of library books :

 

First one: The Secret Game, a non-fiction book about a basketball game held during World War II. This book has both a prologue and an epilogue. Yes, I read both, but, then, history is not my thing, and I figured I could use all the help I could get.

Book two: Latest novel by Danielle Steel. No prologue, no epilogue.

Book Three: Oldie but Goodie by Elizabeth Cadell, one of my favorite writers: ditto — no prologue, no epilogue.

Book four: Mystery set in Victorian London, first of a series: Prologue but no epilogue. Yes, I did read the prologue.

Book five: An oldish novel by author Ann Hood: again, prologue but no epilogue. I haven’t read this one yet, but when I do, I’m sure I’ll read the prologue. I don’t skip beginnings, nor do I skip endings. Middles, now – -I might skip some there if the book is slow, but I aim to give everything I read a fair chance at the start.

I don’t skip beginnings, nor do I skip endings. Middles, now – -I might skip some there if the book is slow, but I aim to give everything I read a fair chance at the start, so I always read the prologue and first few chapters, even if decide not to read the rest of the book. And I might very well read the last chapter and the epilogue if I’m interested in how the plot turned out.

So how close have I come to writing either one in one of my novels?  Not so close. I briefly considered a prologue for Broken Bonds, but it turned into a 5000 word first chapter. I also considered — again, briefly — labelling the final, short, chapter of Rob’s Rebellion as an epilogue, but, again, decided against it. Why? Simply because they have a bad reputation. Ah, well. Clearly not everyone feels the same.

Click here to Reply, Reply to all, or Forward
2.93 GB (19%) of 15 GB used
Last account activity: 0 minutes ago

Details

15 more
Robin

fellow writers

Show details

Finding Their Voices: Using Language to Build Character

rndrbnlogo

Broken Bonds was the first novel I wrote with more than one point of view. The final version has five point-of-view characters, the four characters involved in a romantic relationship and the antagonist who is the “villain” in the political plot. There are three aliens and a Terran: Major Brad Reynolds, a major in the Terran Federation Guard, Ardaval Namar, an BrokenBondsCoverAleyni scholar and teacher, Imarin Namar, one of his former partners, involved in government, and Nidrani Namar, another former partner, a woman, and a musician. As well, there was Senator Hank Manning, a member of the Terran Federation senate.

I wish I could tell y’all that I was wonderfully methodical about this, but, alas, it would be a lie. Ardaval and Brad had appeared in a previous novel, Relocated, so their voices were pretty clear to me. I had little trouble finding a voice for Imarin and Hank Manning, but Nidrani was slower to come clear, and I ended up searching out clothing I thought she might wear to help me out.

I pay attention to grammar, sentence structure, word choice, pet phrases, how formal or informal they typically are in their speech,  pet phrases, etc, but a lot of it involves my being able to “hear” my characters.

One of the things I did was collect up all of the pieces from each character’s point of view and put them together. Then I read through them for consistency of voice and to make sure that they sounded distinct.

I do use grammar and word choice with far more intention for minor characters, where there is less time and space to paint a full picture.

 

 

Skye Taylor http://www.skye-writer.com/blogging_by_the_sea
Marci Baun  http://www.marcibaun.com/blog/
Margaret Fieland https://margaretfieland.wordpress.com
Victoria Chatham http://victoriachatham.blogspot.ca
Beverley Bateman http://beverleybateman.blogspot.ca/
Dr. Bob Rich  http://wp.me/p3Xihq-OB
Rachael Kosinski http://rachaelkosinski.weebly.com/
Judith Copek http://lynx-sis.blogspot.com/
Helena Fairfax http://www.helenafairfax.com
Rhobin Courtright http://www.rhobinleecourtright.com
A.J. Maguire  http://ajmaguire.wordpress.com/

 

Meet Kate Hill/Saloni Quimby

Tell us a little about yourself

I’m a vegetarian New Englander who loves romance fiction and horror movies.

When did you start writing, and how did you start writing erotica?

I’ve been writing for as long as I can remember. I started writing erotica over twenty years ago. My first published work was a short, erotic vampire story.

I notice you write both M/F and M/M romances. Have you ever written a F/F romance? Why or why not?

I have written F/F, but I’ve found it’s more difficult to get published than my m/m and m/f stories.

Do you/did you do anything to make sure your M/M love scenes were authentic?

Like with my m/f or f/f stories, I use various research methods, including reading, seeking feedback and talking to other people about their experiences and as well as using my own experiences.

What genre that you haven’t written in would you like to explore, and why?

I’ve written in the horror genre, but I haven’t had much published in it. I hope that will change in the future.

Who would you site as your greatest influences as a writer?

I don’t feel that one particular writer influenced me more than all others. There have been many over the years.

Who is your favorite romance author?

Again, I don’t have just one favorite romance author. I’ve enjoyed the works of Charlotte Boyett-Compo, Jack Greene, and so many others.

What is your writing process?

Usually the characters come to me first. I then write a loose outline for the story. I like to know how the story starts and ends as well as several major plot points in between, but I also need to have wiggle room.

Are you drawn to any particular themes in your work?

I like antiheroes and villains who become heroes. I also prefer stories with paranormal elements.

What do you want readers to take away from your books?

I just want to entertain people with the stories. If someone loves or hates a particular character or if they find excitement or humor in a particular story, I feel like I’ve done my job.

What are you working on now?

Right now I’m nearly finished with the second story in my Love in the Wild series. In the first story, Knock on Wood, the heroes–John and Earl Eli–were looking for Bigfoot in Maine. In the second story, On the Prowl, they’re in England searching for a giant mystery cat.

Any last words?

Thank you for having me on your blog. I hope those who read Knock on Wood liked the story and enjoy reading On the Prowl as much as I’ve enjoyed writing it.

And check out the latest book by Saloni Quimby:
Love in the Wild 1: Knock on Woodknockonwoodmed
by Saloni Quinby
M/M Erotic Paranormal Romance
 
On a dare from a friend, skeptic John Smith travels to the woods of Maine to investigate Bigfoot sightings. The last thing he expects to find besides a legendary creature is a sexy trail guide.
 
Earl Eli plans to trick his pretentious guest with a fake Bigfoot appearance, but when he and John fall for each other, he calls off the hoax — or so he thinks.
 
In the wilderness, a beast, a violin and two men in a log cabin equal a recipe for action.
 
Excerpt:
 
When John woke, it was pitch-dark in the loft. He reached down and fumbled through his backpack for a torch.
 
At first, he thought a sound had wakened him, but there was only silence. The urge to pee told him that he had most likely woken due to a different call of nature.
 
He switched on the torch and glanced at Earl Eli who was sound asleep, his handsome face relaxed and lips slightly parted. His muscular arms were folded under his head, the top of his broad back exposed as the blanket covered him only to his waist.
 
John thought how cute Earl Eli looked when asleep and resisted the urge to kiss him. Just because he was wide-awake didn’t mean he should disturb his Earl Eli’s sleep.
 
John quietly left the bed and found his headtorch, since it would be easier than the hand one. He climbed down the ladder, left the cabin and walked to the outhouse. Indoor plumbing was one thing he missed here in the woods. Other than that, he was enjoying cabin life with his gorgeous lover.
 
John wondered if their relationship would end once he returned to England. Probably. A long-distance love affair would be difficult. John didn’t want to leave his job and he doubted Earl Eli would give up his business in Maine.
 
Yet a good, solid relationship was hard to find and would be worth sacrifices.
 
John was getting ahead of himself. At the moment they didn’t have a solid relationship. All they had was amazing sex.
 
John reached the outhouse and relieved himself. He’d just finished when he heard a deep growl followed by a grunt.
 
He froze.
 
“A bear,” he whispered. “It must be a bear.”
 
Purchase Link:
 

For Oct 22: A Book by Any Other Title

RoundRobinBlogTour

One of the first things any reader knows about a book is the title — and the author and the cover image, but for now let’s stick to the title. We all want a catchy title for our books, one that will stop a potential reader in their tracks and make them open it up (or click on it) to discover what it’s really about. And we all want a title that’s going to pop up when readers are searching on Amazon for books in our genre.

So, when I go to my local library or bookstore and search for something to read, I start by browsing through the shelf of new books, checking out the titles and, if it looks interesting, plucking it off the shelf, opening it up, and reading the blurb. Then maybe I’ll check out the first couple of pages.

I’m staring at my latest collection of library books, one of which is “Little Beach Street Bakery,” a book I chose in just such a manner. It sounds satisfying — not disturbing, not likely to give me nightmares, which is what I was in the mood for at the time.

So, hmm — what attracts me to a title depends on my mood, and therefore what I want in a book at the time: romance, mystery, adventure, horror, or whatever.

I wish I could say that I have a wonderful method for choosing titles for my books, but I don’t. Sometimes they just come to me, and sometimes I have to work at it.

The title of  Relocated,   just came to me. It’s about a teenage boy who ends up on an alien planet when his father is sent there to help root out some terrorists.  The title of Geek Games   and Broken Bonds took more work, as did my latest novel, Rob’s Rebellion. Its working title was “Rob’s Book,” after the main character, Colonel Robert Walker, a colonel in the Terran Federation Guard who is posted to the alien planet Aleyne with orders to arrest the current, very popular, commander of the military base there on charges of treason. I eventually ended up soliciting suggestions from my reading group.

What attracts you to a particular title? Leave a comment and let us know, and do check out the thoughts of my fellow posters:

“Marci Baun  http://www.marcibaun.com/blog/
A.J. Maguire  http://ajmaguire.wordpress.com/
Victoria Chatham http://victoriachatham.blogspot.ca
Skye Taylor http://www.skye-writer.com/blogging_by_the_sea
Judith Copek http://lynx-sis.blogspot.com/
Helena Fairfax http://www.helenafairfax.com
Heather Haven http://heatherhavenstories.com/blog/
Dr. Bob Rich  http://wp.me/p3Xihq-MI
Connie Vines http://connievines.blogspot.com/
Margaret Fieland https://margaretfieland.wordpress.com
Rachael Kosinski http://rachaelkosinski.weebly.com/
Rhobin Courtright http://www.rhobinleecourtright.com

Interview with Susan Hughes

Tell us something about yourself

sue

I’m a USA Today bestselling author of contemporary and historical romance. I live in Ottawa, Ontario, with my husband and three children.

Tell us something about your new book

My new release is A Baby for New Year’s. Since my first holiday romance, A Baby for Christmas, has been my best seller, I decided to write a sequel where Meg, the heroine’s single coworker and friend, gets her own second chance at love. More than a love story, A Baby for New Year’s is the story of a fractured family struggling to put aside their differences for the sake of a girl who needs their help. A Baby for New Year’s is an independent story, so you don’t need to have read the first book in order to enjoy it.

How did you get your start as a writer?

I have been writing stories since I was a little girl, always with the goal of being a novelist someday. I started writing romance about 15 years ago.

Which is your favorite, contemporary or historical romance?

I like reading and writing both equally, but historical is more challenging to write.

Do you use real places in your stories, or do you make them up?

I have used real places and fictitious ones. So far all of my settings have been in Canada.

If you could meet any writer, alive or dead, whom would you pick and why?

William Shakespeare, so I could settle once and for all whether he really wrote those plays (LOL).

I notice from your website that you do copy editing. If you pick up a book with a large number of grammatical errors, what do you do?

I probably wouldn’t finish reading it and wouldn’t buy another book by that author, but I’d never write a negative review. I just wouldn’t have the heart to do that to another author.

What is your favorite among your own works?

I am fond of my historical Music Box series because I used elements from my own parents’ lives to round out the details of life in the 1940s and 50s.

Who is your favorite romance writer, and why?

It’s too hard to pick a favorite! Recently I have really enjoyed Alice Orr and J.M. Maurer.

If you had to be marooned on a desert island with only one book, what would it be?

Probably some kind of survival manual.

What are you working on now?

I’m trying to finish off a Christmas novella with a tight deadline!

And do check out Sue’s latest novel, A Baby for New Year’s:

A Baby for New Year’s buy link for Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/jenoagy   New Years cover.indd

Blurb:

After an emotionally destructive marriage, Meg has settled into a quiet life as a single mother. When her pregnant teenage niece arrives at her door, seeking shelter, Meg finds herself caught in a family drama between the girl’s parents. She hasn’t seen her estranged sister Kelly or her former brother-in-law Evan in years, but she hasn’t forgotten her secret crush on him when they were teenagers. Now that he’s single again, he still makes Meg weak in the knees. As the New Year brings complications she never thought she wanted, should she listen to her heart and take a chance on love?

Excerpt:

Evan stood waiting at the top of the stairs, a small smile hovering on his lips. “They’re great kids,” he whispered.

“Yeah, they are. And you’re going to be an awesome grandfather,” Meg added with a quiet chuckle. “You know, before Julie was born, I couldn’t picture you as a dad. But you were a natural with her right from the start. And right now, I honestly can’t picture a kid calling you ‘Grandpa.’ But I know you’ll be wonderful.”

His smile widened. “Thank you, Meg. That means a lot to me.”

She meant to walk past him and head downstairs. But she paused beside him, overcome with feeling for him, and lifted her hand to touch his face. She caressed her fingertips across the coarse day’s growth on his cheek, her thumb grazing his soft mouth. The dim light from the living room glittered in his beautiful eyes.

“You’re a wonderful man,” she murmured.

Evan’s lips parted slightly. His warm, intent gaze tangled with hers, while his hand covered hers and he pressed a gentle kiss to the tip of her thumb.

Awareness quivered from Meg’s hand straight to the pit of her stomach. Her heart slammed against her ribs with a blow that made her catch her breath.

She knew she ought to suppress her feelings. She should walk away and send him straight back to his hotel. But she stayed rooted to the floor, only letting her hand fall from his mouth as he bent to graze his lips against her temple.

“You’re wearing that rose scent again,” he whispered. “That fragrance haunts my dreams.”

Meg closed her eyes as desire for him spiraled through her in a heady rush. Tilting her face upward, she leaned into him and brushed her lips against his mouth.

Links:

Website: www.susanrhughes.weebly.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Susan-R-Hughes/150348171749025

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Susan_R_Hughes

 

 

Guest post by Amy McCorkle for Feb. 3

Dear Daniel,amyat275

 

Different people have shaped me over the years. I think it should be obvious by now confrontational tones or people I don’t do well with. It just exacerbates every negative attribute I have. But some people have had a dual effect on me.

When I was seventeen years old I think I had one of the most stressful jobs ever. I worked for Daniel T. Taylor III. He is a local attorney who’d argued before the Supreme Court—and won. He hired me as a runner. I had no car. Hell, I didn’t even have a driver’s license. It was my first summer job, and honestly, as hard as it was, and as crazy (in a good way) that he was, I learned a great deal. And when he paid me a compliment at the end of the summer I was touched. But man was I relieved when I walked out of his office for the last time.

That being said, I want to say I learned what the words ‘work ethic’ meant. I didn’t know how to take shorthand. I still don’t, but I fashioned my own ‘short hand’ when he would dictate memos. I was constantly screwing them up. And he wasn’t the most patient man. But he taught me the meaning of the word professionalism. To address someone as Doctor when someone was a doctor, not as Mr. And to respect those around me.

I had me run errands on foot in an area that I was sure to get lost in. And I did. But I figured it out. He gave me enough rope to hang myself with and more often than not I was able to avoid that particular messy situation.

I answered phones. I went to court. On more than one occasion he made me want to cry. But I don’t hold that against him, he made his clients cry too.

Of course, while working for him I gained like twenty pounds. Which, at any age isn’t good, and as seventeen year old is horrible.

Which brings me to this. He taught me a work ethic is invaluable. That loyalty is irreplaceable. And that respecting those in positions of authority can be a good thing as well as something you might question your sanity over lol.

And then there’s that matter of the twenty pounds. I had field hockey practice and marching band to start with that year. It was horrendous.

Although, when I look back at those pictures now I see how pretty I really was. Funny how we see ourselves. I saw myself as this bloated, ugly, piece of shit back then. All of my sisters were thin, so I thought that equaled pretty. Not that my biological father did my self-esteem any good on that front.

So back on the wagon. I’m eating real food, not the shakes. And I plan on getting exercise. Real exercise. I’ve already built up and endurance. Not much of one. But it might make the walk to and from the Covention Center to the hotel during Fandom Fest/Fright Night easier to handle.

Talking to Mr. Taylor today (yes, the crazy old coot is still alive) made me reflect upon all of this stuff. He really was a great guy. Maybe not someone I’d want to work for again. And when I think about it I worked my first job as a server at a Derby party. The Kentucky Derby that is. He had rich people and important people there. Sometimes the same. Other times they were not.

And let me tell you, a bunch of rich, drunk people singing and playing the piano, *snicker. They went on and on about how great they sounded. From one of the few sober people at the party, the truth was anything but. However, that being said, they were all nice to me. Especially the Human Rights lawyers who took on pro bono death penalty cases. I was only sixteen years old and they listened to me like my opinion mattered.

That taught me a profound lesson. Everyone, no matter what their station in life. With money, without money, white collar, blue collar, or poverty stricken, we all mattered. I was fortunate enough to live in a house at that point. My family’s trailer days behind us. But we didn’t live in the best of neighborhoods. Honestly, I still don’t.

Of course I dream of living in a nice neighborhood. In a nice home with a finished basement. I also dream of owning a car. Of any kind. But disability and thirty-five dollar quarterly royalty check ain’t gonna make that happen.

So I do the one thing I know I’m good at. I work. I write. And I promote my brand. Eventually, if the story is good enough, I know I’ll breakthrough.

 

Sincerely,

Amy McCorkle

LtDebook

  1. At http://letters-todaniel.blogspot.com

http://twitter.com/letterstodaniel

https://www.facebook.com/amy.l.mccorkle.5

http://instagram/letterstodaniel

https://www.facebook.com/letterstodaniel/

 

Buy links:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Letters-Daniel-Amy-Leigh-McCorkle-ebook/dp/B01A1V35IQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1453256095&sr=1-1&keywords=letters+to+daniel+amy

 

Available on Amazon in Print as well.

 

Amy McCorkle is an award winning and bestselling author, blogger, screenwriter and filmmaker with 10 Amazon Bestselling titles including the #1 Bella Morte: Beginnings. A 2015 Epic Finalist with a small collection of letters from the blog. This landed her an agent and she went on to collect all the letters one large volume and receive a blurb from bestselling author and producer Joel Eisenberg. Her documentary based on the letters has gone on to screen at 5 film festivals and win awards at 3 of them.