Monthly Archives: October 2016

Meet Kate Hill/Saloni Quimby

Tell us a little about yourself

I’m a vegetarian New Englander who loves romance fiction and horror movies.

When did you start writing, and how did you start writing erotica?

I’ve been writing for as long as I can remember. I started writing erotica over twenty years ago. My first published work was a short, erotic vampire story.

I notice you write both M/F and M/M romances. Have you ever written a F/F romance? Why or why not?

I have written F/F, but I’ve found it’s more difficult to get published than my m/m and m/f stories.

Do you/did you do anything to make sure your M/M love scenes were authentic?

Like with my m/f or f/f stories, I use various research methods, including reading, seeking feedback and talking to other people about their experiences and as well as using my own experiences.

What genre that you haven’t written in would you like to explore, and why?

I’ve written in the horror genre, but I haven’t had much published in it. I hope that will change in the future.

Who would you site as your greatest influences as a writer?

I don’t feel that one particular writer influenced me more than all others. There have been many over the years.

Who is your favorite romance author?

Again, I don’t have just one favorite romance author. I’ve enjoyed the works of Charlotte Boyett-Compo, Jack Greene, and so many others.

What is your writing process?

Usually the characters come to me first. I then write a loose outline for the story. I like to know how the story starts and ends as well as several major plot points in between, but I also need to have wiggle room.

Are you drawn to any particular themes in your work?

I like antiheroes and villains who become heroes. I also prefer stories with paranormal elements.

What do you want readers to take away from your books?

I just want to entertain people with the stories. If someone loves or hates a particular character or if they find excitement or humor in a particular story, I feel like I’ve done my job.

What are you working on now?

Right now I’m nearly finished with the second story in my Love in the Wild series. In the first story, Knock on Wood, the heroes–John and Earl Eli–were looking for Bigfoot in Maine. In the second story, On the Prowl, they’re in England searching for a giant mystery cat.

Any last words?

Thank you for having me on your blog. I hope those who read Knock on Wood liked the story and enjoy reading On the Prowl as much as I’ve enjoyed writing it.

And check out the latest book by Saloni Quimby:
Love in the Wild 1: Knock on Woodknockonwoodmed
by Saloni Quinby
M/M Erotic Paranormal Romance
 
On a dare from a friend, skeptic John Smith travels to the woods of Maine to investigate Bigfoot sightings. The last thing he expects to find besides a legendary creature is a sexy trail guide.
 
Earl Eli plans to trick his pretentious guest with a fake Bigfoot appearance, but when he and John fall for each other, he calls off the hoax — or so he thinks.
 
In the wilderness, a beast, a violin and two men in a log cabin equal a recipe for action.
 
Excerpt:
 
When John woke, it was pitch-dark in the loft. He reached down and fumbled through his backpack for a torch.
 
At first, he thought a sound had wakened him, but there was only silence. The urge to pee told him that he had most likely woken due to a different call of nature.
 
He switched on the torch and glanced at Earl Eli who was sound asleep, his handsome face relaxed and lips slightly parted. His muscular arms were folded under his head, the top of his broad back exposed as the blanket covered him only to his waist.
 
John thought how cute Earl Eli looked when asleep and resisted the urge to kiss him. Just because he was wide-awake didn’t mean he should disturb his Earl Eli’s sleep.
 
John quietly left the bed and found his headtorch, since it would be easier than the hand one. He climbed down the ladder, left the cabin and walked to the outhouse. Indoor plumbing was one thing he missed here in the woods. Other than that, he was enjoying cabin life with his gorgeous lover.
 
John wondered if their relationship would end once he returned to England. Probably. A long-distance love affair would be difficult. John didn’t want to leave his job and he doubted Earl Eli would give up his business in Maine.
 
Yet a good, solid relationship was hard to find and would be worth sacrifices.
 
John was getting ahead of himself. At the moment they didn’t have a solid relationship. All they had was amazing sex.
 
John reached the outhouse and relieved himself. He’d just finished when he heard a deep growl followed by a grunt.
 
He froze.
 
“A bear,” he whispered. “It must be a bear.”
 
Purchase Link:
 
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For Oct 22: A Book by Any Other Title

RoundRobinBlogTour

One of the first things any reader knows about a book is the title — and the author and the cover image, but for now let’s stick to the title. We all want a catchy title for our books, one that will stop a potential reader in their tracks and make them open it up (or click on it) to discover what it’s really about. And we all want a title that’s going to pop up when readers are searching on Amazon for books in our genre.

So, when I go to my local library or bookstore and search for something to read, I start by browsing through the shelf of new books, checking out the titles and, if it looks interesting, plucking it off the shelf, opening it up, and reading the blurb. Then maybe I’ll check out the first couple of pages.

I’m staring at my latest collection of library books, one of which is “Little Beach Street Bakery,” a book I chose in just such a manner. It sounds satisfying — not disturbing, not likely to give me nightmares, which is what I was in the mood for at the time.

So, hmm — what attracts me to a title depends on my mood, and therefore what I want in a book at the time: romance, mystery, adventure, horror, or whatever.

I wish I could say that I have a wonderful method for choosing titles for my books, but I don’t. Sometimes they just come to me, and sometimes I have to work at it.

The title of  Relocated,   just came to me. It’s about a teenage boy who ends up on an alien planet when his father is sent there to help root out some terrorists.  The title of Geek Games   and Broken Bonds took more work, as did my latest novel, Rob’s Rebellion. Its working title was “Rob’s Book,” after the main character, Colonel Robert Walker, a colonel in the Terran Federation Guard who is posted to the alien planet Aleyne with orders to arrest the current, very popular, commander of the military base there on charges of treason. I eventually ended up soliciting suggestions from my reading group.

What attracts you to a particular title? Leave a comment and let us know, and do check out the thoughts of my fellow posters:

“Marci Baun  http://www.marcibaun.com/blog/
A.J. Maguire  http://ajmaguire.wordpress.com/
Victoria Chatham http://victoriachatham.blogspot.ca
Skye Taylor http://www.skye-writer.com/blogging_by_the_sea
Judith Copek http://lynx-sis.blogspot.com/
Helena Fairfax http://www.helenafairfax.com
Heather Haven http://heatherhavenstories.com/blog/
Dr. Bob Rich  http://wp.me/p3Xihq-MI
Connie Vines http://connievines.blogspot.com/
Margaret Fieland https://margaretfieland.wordpress.com
Rachael Kosinski http://rachaelkosinski.weebly.com/
Rhobin Courtright http://www.rhobinleecourtright.com

Poetic Forms: Sestina

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The sestina is a poetic form consisting of six six-line stanzas and a three-line envoy. It is attributed to twelfth century French troubadour Arnaut Daniel.The six end words of the first stanza cycle in a pattern thusly:

B  E/ D C/ F A
or
F  A/D  C/B  E

There are several online “Sestina Generators” that will spit out the correct pattern given the six end words of the first stanza, for example:

http://www.renajmosteirin.com/sestina.html

Here is a link to another sestina generator

dilute.net/sestinas

How to choose your end words

There are many ways to choose end words. One is to write the first stanza and then lay out the pattern for the rest. The other, the one I often use, is to pick six words, generate the skeleton, and start writing. I try to choose words with more than one meaning and that can be used as more than one part of speech.

Before writing your own, check out some of these:

Here is a link to  sestina by Elizabeth Bishop:

http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sestina/

Here are the first two stanzas:

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September rain falls on the house.
In the failing light, the old grandmother
sits in the kitchen with the child
beside the Little Marvel Stove,
reading the jokes from the almanac,
laughing and talking to hide her tears.

She thinks that her equinoctial tears
and the rain that beats on the roof of the house
were both foretold by the almanac,
but only known to a grandmother.
The iron kettle sings on the stove.
She cuts some bread and says to the child

Here is a  link to sestina by Ezra Pound:

http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15423

Here is one of mine, one that rhymes:

Gone Shopping

Now, sit and listen to my tale
of a beautiful flyer that came in the mail
with pictures of roses and posies on sale.
It looked so alluring, I ran to catch the rail.
The train was pulling out, and I turned rather pale,
but spotted a taxi I was able to hail.

My heart was pounding. I had to inhale
many deep breaths, then told the driver my tale
I started a list: flowers, rake, shovel, pail
but became distracted by a handsome male
beside the road, leaning on a rail,
holding a small boat with a red sail.

Despite my eagerness to get to the sale,
I stopped the taxi in order to hail
the handsome stranger leaning on the rail.
I wondered if he would turn tail,
but I decided he was such a stunning male,
to take a chance. He glared at me, casting a pall

over my joy in the day. I turned quite pale
when he told me he intended to sail
his small boat on the pond, and only a female
would be so stupid as to hale
a stranger with such a sorry tale.
He went on and on, continued to rail

at me. I was completely unable to derail
his ranting. I told him to stick his head in a pail
then stick the hole thing up his tail
and exactly what he could do with his sail.
Then it started to hail.
I shook loose from the demented male.

jumped back in the taxi to ponder my mail,
told the driver to take to the trail.
I let out my breath with a big exhale.
The whole incident left me shaky and pale,
but I was determined to get to that sale,
even though it meant turning tail.

I left the handsome male. I did buy the flowers, rake, and pail.
But I took the rail when I returned from the sale,
still whole, hearty and hale. I hope you enjoyed my tale.

Go ahead, give it a try for yourself, and, if you like, post yours in the comments.

Poetic forms: Centos and Haikus

Poetic forms: the cento

A cento is like a rag rug, it’s composed of bits and pieces from other things. In the case of the rug, it’s pieces of old fabric. For the cento, it’s made of verses or passages from other poems, songs, articles, stories, or whatever by other authors.811583493_2871931482_0

Here’s a link to follow for more about centos:

https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/text/cento-poetic-form

The first cento I ever wrote was a haiku sequence, and perhaps because I’m a musician, I composed it using verses from old songs: Clementine, Go Tell Aunt Rhody, The Twelve Days of Christmas, Jingle Bells, Good King Wencheslas, and the old Tennessee Ernie Ford song, “Sixteen Tons,” which is one of my favorites. The haiku sequence was the traditional 5-7-5 syllable count of the Japanese haiku, rather than the freer form (seventeen syllables or less) used in so many modern American haiku. Choosing the 5-7-5 syllable count made it easy to select the songs.

 

See

https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/text/haiku-poetic-form

for more about haikus.

 

Go tell Aunt Rhody, A Haiku Sequence

 

Twelve drummers drumming

When the snow was round about

Now the ground is white

 

Nine ladies dancing

Excavating for a mine

Dashing through the snow

 

Ten lords a leaping

When the snow lay round about

making spirits bright

 

Dashing through the snow

A partridge in a pear tree

Make the Yule-tide gay

 

If the Fates allow

When a poor man came in sight

Let your heart be light

 

And the store boss said

When a poor man came in sight

jingle all the way!

 

Here’s one I wrote  using lines from songs about the sea.

Sailor’s Song

 

A hundred years ago, three thousand miles away

A Yankee ship came down the river

With the tinkers and tailors and soldiers and all

 

Bound to the westward where the stormy winds blow

When this bold pirate

Fought them up and down

 

Fire in the cabin, fire in the hold

For to fight the foreign foe

Captain Hull broke his heart and died

 

He fought like a hero till he died

And fifty-five more lay bleeding in gore

Then the signal was sent for the grand ship to anchor.

They dug his grave with a silver spade

 

 

Here’s where they came from:

http://www.contemplator.com/sea/index.html

A Hundred Years Ago, “A Hundred years ago”

Three Thousand Miles, “Three Thousand Miles Away”

Blow, Boys, Blow, “A Yankee Ship Came Down the River”

Blow the Man Down, “With the tinkers and tailors and soldiers and all”

The Dreadnought, “..bound to the westward where the stormy winds blow”

The Bold Princess Royal, ” .. when this bold pirate”

Admiral Benbow, ” ..fought them up and down”

Fire Down Below, ” Fire in the cabin, fire in the hold,”

Johnny Todd, “For to fight the foreign foe”

Captain Hull, “Captain Hull”

Boney Was A Warrior “broke his heart and died”

Bold Nelson’s Praise, “He fought like a hero till he died”

John Paul Jones, “and fifty-five more lay bleeding in gore”

Spanish Ladies, “Then the signal was sent for the grand ship to anchor”

Storm Along, “They Dug His Grave with a silver spade”

And how, you might ask, did I pick these lines? After I decided I wanted to write a cento using lines from songs about the sea, I searched for a website, and found the one above. I started down the list of songs, picking lines that looked like they might fit. Then I rearranged them. Then I rearranged them again. Then I passed the result past my poetry critique group, removed two lines that didn’t fit, and rearranged the poem into three line stanzas instead of quatrains. And there it was.

Try it — it’s loads of fun.

 

 

Interview with Susan Hughes

Tell us something about yourself

sue

I’m a USA Today bestselling author of contemporary and historical romance. I live in Ottawa, Ontario, with my husband and three children.

Tell us something about your new book

My new release is A Baby for New Year’s. Since my first holiday romance, A Baby for Christmas, has been my best seller, I decided to write a sequel where Meg, the heroine’s single coworker and friend, gets her own second chance at love. More than a love story, A Baby for New Year’s is the story of a fractured family struggling to put aside their differences for the sake of a girl who needs their help. A Baby for New Year’s is an independent story, so you don’t need to have read the first book in order to enjoy it.

How did you get your start as a writer?

I have been writing stories since I was a little girl, always with the goal of being a novelist someday. I started writing romance about 15 years ago.

Which is your favorite, contemporary or historical romance?

I like reading and writing both equally, but historical is more challenging to write.

Do you use real places in your stories, or do you make them up?

I have used real places and fictitious ones. So far all of my settings have been in Canada.

If you could meet any writer, alive or dead, whom would you pick and why?

William Shakespeare, so I could settle once and for all whether he really wrote those plays (LOL).

I notice from your website that you do copy editing. If you pick up a book with a large number of grammatical errors, what do you do?

I probably wouldn’t finish reading it and wouldn’t buy another book by that author, but I’d never write a negative review. I just wouldn’t have the heart to do that to another author.

What is your favorite among your own works?

I am fond of my historical Music Box series because I used elements from my own parents’ lives to round out the details of life in the 1940s and 50s.

Who is your favorite romance writer, and why?

It’s too hard to pick a favorite! Recently I have really enjoyed Alice Orr and J.M. Maurer.

If you had to be marooned on a desert island with only one book, what would it be?

Probably some kind of survival manual.

What are you working on now?

I’m trying to finish off a Christmas novella with a tight deadline!

And do check out Sue’s latest novel, A Baby for New Year’s:

A Baby for New Year’s buy link for Amazon: http://tinyurl.com/jenoagy   New Years cover.indd

Blurb:

After an emotionally destructive marriage, Meg has settled into a quiet life as a single mother. When her pregnant teenage niece arrives at her door, seeking shelter, Meg finds herself caught in a family drama between the girl’s parents. She hasn’t seen her estranged sister Kelly or her former brother-in-law Evan in years, but she hasn’t forgotten her secret crush on him when they were teenagers. Now that he’s single again, he still makes Meg weak in the knees. As the New Year brings complications she never thought she wanted, should she listen to her heart and take a chance on love?

Excerpt:

Evan stood waiting at the top of the stairs, a small smile hovering on his lips. “They’re great kids,” he whispered.

“Yeah, they are. And you’re going to be an awesome grandfather,” Meg added with a quiet chuckle. “You know, before Julie was born, I couldn’t picture you as a dad. But you were a natural with her right from the start. And right now, I honestly can’t picture a kid calling you ‘Grandpa.’ But I know you’ll be wonderful.”

His smile widened. “Thank you, Meg. That means a lot to me.”

She meant to walk past him and head downstairs. But she paused beside him, overcome with feeling for him, and lifted her hand to touch his face. She caressed her fingertips across the coarse day’s growth on his cheek, her thumb grazing his soft mouth. The dim light from the living room glittered in his beautiful eyes.

“You’re a wonderful man,” she murmured.

Evan’s lips parted slightly. His warm, intent gaze tangled with hers, while his hand covered hers and he pressed a gentle kiss to the tip of her thumb.

Awareness quivered from Meg’s hand straight to the pit of her stomach. Her heart slammed against her ribs with a blow that made her catch her breath.

She knew she ought to suppress her feelings. She should walk away and send him straight back to his hotel. But she stayed rooted to the floor, only letting her hand fall from his mouth as he bent to graze his lips against her temple.

“You’re wearing that rose scent again,” he whispered. “That fragrance haunts my dreams.”

Meg closed her eyes as desire for him spiraled through her in a heady rush. Tilting her face upward, she leaned into him and brushed her lips against his mouth.

Links:

Website: www.susanrhughes.weebly.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Susan-R-Hughes/150348171749025

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Susan_R_Hughes