Keep on Reading

AleyneDesert1
What glues you to a story start to finish?

What hooks do you use to capture your readers?

 

What glues me to a novel? If I  care about the characters and I want to know what happens to them. What turns me off? Contrived plots, romances where the hero and heroine could solve all their problems if they only spoke to each other. That is the biggest turn off going for me.

I am not a Christian, but one thing I’ve noticed about Christian romances (I’ve reviewed a couple) is that the basic conflict often centers around a crisis of faith on the part of either the hero or heroine. Now that is a plot I can wrap my mind around, and a conflict that will keep me reading.

What do I use to keep my readers reading? Characters I and they care about, and conflicts based on fundamental differences that eventually get resolved.

Want to know what they are? Check out my author page on MuseItUp Publishing

Beverley Bateman http://beverleybateman.blogspot.ca/
Diane Bator http://dbator.blogspot.ca/q
Ginger Simpson http://www.cowboykisses.blogspot.com/
Skye Taylor  http://www.skye-writer.com/
Marci Baun  http://www.marcibaun.com/
Margaret Fieland http://www.margaretfieland.com/blog1/
Helena Fairfax  http://helenafairfax.com/
Anne Stenhouse  http://annestenhousenovelist.wordpress.com/
Fiona McGier http://www.fionamcgier.com/
Connie Vines http://connievines.blogspot.com/
Rachael Kosnski http://rachaelkosinski.weebly.com/
Victoria Chatham http://victoriachatham.webs.com/
Lynn Crain  http://www.awriterinvienna.blogspot.com
Rhobin Courtright http://www.rhobinleecourtright.com/

Beverley Bateman http://beverleybateman.blogspot.ca/
Diane Bator http://dbator.blogspot.ca/q
Ginger Simpson http://www.cowboykisses.blogspot.com/
Skye Taylor  http://www.skye-writer.com/
Marci Baun  http://www.marcibaun.com/
Margaret Fieland http://www.margaretfieland.com/blog1/
Helena Fairfax  http://helenafairfax.com/
Anne Stenhouse  http://annestenhousenovelist.wordpress.com/
Fiona McGier http://www.fionamcgier.com/
Connie Vines http://connievines.blogspot.com/
Rachael Kosnski http://rachaelkosinski.weebly.com/
Victoria Chatham http://victoriachatham.webs.com/
Lynn Crain  http://www.awriterinvienna.blogspot.com
Rhobin Courtright http://www.rhobinleecourtright.com/

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8 thoughts on “Keep on Reading

  1. Skye Taylor

    I couldn’t agree with you more. In my twenties I devoured romances, contemporary, historical, regency you name it. But then the genre became so predictable, and as you point out, if the hero and heroine had sat down and talked there would be no story. I got tired of two people so hot to get into each other’s pants that they were drooling for 200 pages with nothing more than a misunderstanding about something trivial or easily solved, that I stopped reading romances. But I’m a romantic at heart. I do enjoy Lee Child, Vince Flynn, David Baldacci and others like them, but I always want to come back to a love story. And in my mind Love story and romance are not synonymous. Gone with the Wind was a love story, but it didn’t have a happy ending. The Way We Were was a love story that also didn’t have a happy ending. Some romances are love stories, too, but some are so formulaic I just lose interest.

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  2. Robin

    I agree Margaret, and with Skye, too — when the plot’s drama could be cured by some conversation, it drives me nuts. If there is a serious outside issue that keeps one quiet, well that’s different. I also agree with your story hook of fundamental differences.

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  3. Ginger

    I totally agree with you. Unless I can connect with the characters, the book is useless. I also don’t like sex, sex, sex without a story line. If the characters are always in bed, bumping and grinding, it’s a no go for me.

    Also…despite several attempts to get people to change my blog address, you still have the wrong one, and you are missing the logo that connects you to the rest of the group. Robin has it, if you need it. Good post!

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  4. Marci Baun

    I hate those, too, Margaret. There needs to be more than the excuse of not communicating. Yes, a lot of people in real life have issues with communication, but many stories take it to the extreme.

    Marci

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  5. J.Q. Rose

    I’m with you on the predictable stories. Romance readers usually do expect a HEA. Even guidelines on romance publishers sites demand an HEA. Even if I know it will end happily, if I like the characters and the writer’s voice Ill still read the story to see how she pulls it off.

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  6. Fiona McGier

    Ah yes, those characters who never talk to each other, yet we’re supposed to believe that good sex is enough to give them a HEA? The best sex has talking not only AFTER the act, but before and during the act! And laughing…it’s not just your bodies you’re sharing, if you’re falling in love. It’s everything about you. So yes, your talking has to happen.

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  7. Beverley Bateman

    I agree with your post. Again, it comes down to characters. Do you care about them? My big complaint is the too stupid to live heroine. The one that goes into the dark basement when she know the killer might be there.

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