Monthly Archives: January 2015

Reading and Writing

This month’s topic:811583493_2871931482_0
What is your favorite time and place to read? How about writing time? Do you have to make time?

Do you have a ritual or is your plan helter-skelter? I had a quilting teacher who followed the swiss cheese method to completing tasks: Make a hole here, and sometime later a hole there; keep repeating this until the whole thing is complete. What’s your method?

I am tempted to read anytime and anyplace, but my favorite time to read is in bed before I turn out the light and go to sleep.  I am an avid reader, and reading before bed relaxes me and helps me let go of my problems and anxieties. I enjoy reading all kinds of books, especially science fiction, fantasy, and romance {blush} as well as popular novels. I don’t enjoy reading horror but do like reading the occasional mystery. I have read all of Sherlock Holmes, many more than once. I love Alice in Wonderland, and used to reread it every exam time when I was in college. I had a copy of  The Annotated Alice, and this was the one I read and reread. In the commentary, it had a copy of Jabberwocky in French. What a trip that was.

I studied French in both high school and college, and I was (and am) fairly fluent, but, let me tell you, reading made-up words in a foreign language is tough. One summer I spent in the Netherlands doing work-study — I was assistant to a professor at one of the universities. I signed up at the local library. This was one of the first things I did — I needed to have access to a decent supply of books. They had one shelf of books in English, but fortunately a whole bookcase of volumes in French.

I read Fahrenheit 451 in French (fortunately, I’d already read it in English), as well as several other sci fi novels. I read some non-fiction, including one by a cancer surgeon that haunts me to this day. I also discovered George Simenon,and read every copy they had of the Inspecteur Maigret novels. My father was an attorney, so I was familiar with the difference between the French and English/American legal systems.

In case you’re not, it’s like this: In English and American legal systems, you’re innocent until proven guilty. In the French system, you’re guilty until proven innocent. This makes the stakes for Maigret, charged with investigating a crime and discovering the guilty party, that much higher. If he gets it wrong, an innocent person might suffer.

After I finished the Maigret novels, I started on the rest of their Simenon collection.

I haunt my local library. I begin to suffer from anxiety if I don’t have a stack of books to read. I prefer paper to ebooks, but I do read ebooks sometimes. Having access to them eases my book anxiety — I can pretty much always go online and find something else to read.

Check out what my fellow bloggers have to say:
A.J. Maguire  http://ajmaguire.wordpress.com/
Geeta Kakade http://geetakakade.blogspot.com/
Skye Taylor  http://www.skye-writer.com/
Marci Baun  http://www.marcibaun.com/
Fiona McGier http://www.fionamcgier.com/
Connie Vines http://connievines.blogspot.com/
Beverley Bateman http://beverleybateman.blogspot.ca/
Rita Karnopp  http://www.mizging@blogspot.com
Rachael Kosnski http://the-doodling-booktease.tumblr.com/
Helena Fairfax  http://helenafairfax.com/
Heidi M. Thomas http://heidiwriter.wordpress.com/
Ginger Simpson http://www.cowboykisses.blogspot.com/
Rhobin Courtright http://www.rhobinleecourtright.com/

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