Monthly Archives: July 2012

And it’s a poetry book

“Sand in the Desert,” the collection of poems I wrote to go with “Relocated,” is now available in both print and kindle format. Here’s the link on Amazon. It’s available on Barnes and Noble, too.

http://tinyurl.com/SandPoetryPrint

http://tinyurl.com/SandPoetry

I’ve gotten one review so far (for the kindle edition) – five stars.

 

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It’s a Book!

Relocated goes live on publisher’s website
http://tinyurl.com/MuseRelocated/

Check out this excerpt from the start of chapter 1:

“What do you mean I must undergo a psi exam? The Terran Federation legislates against any use of psi.” The speaker, a human woman with wild gray hair, glared at the immigration official.

I gazed at the official. Like most Aleyni, he stood over six feet, slender, with extra wide hands, and thumbs able to bend all the way back. His head appeared more oval than humans, too, and he showed almost no external ears. His skin appeared almost black, like Dad’s and mine, and hers appeared pale. His dark skin provided a welcome spot of color against the general gray of the space port interior. The temperature felt pleasant enough, though; nicely warm instead of the chill of the Terran Federation space station circling above Aleyne.

He could have been reading a laundry list. “Madam, Aleyne is a sovereign planet, not part of the Terran Federation, and if you want to clear immigration you must undergo a psi exam.” He pushed a data cube toward her. “Either sign the consent form and undergo the exam, or go back up to the space station.” He added, “Take it or leave it,” in Aleyni. No one else noticed.

She threw the data cube on the floor, stomped, and it shattered into fragments. “I won’t do it. I don’t want any aliens screwing around in my head.”

The official stared at her for a moment. “It’s against our ethics to screw around.”

The woman crossed her arms. “I don’t believe you.”

“You can return to the space station and take the next ship out.” The official’s face revealed nothing, and his gray eyes stared straight at her. His hands hung loose at his side. I considered him a model of polite behavior, considering. I would have punched her.

The woman stared at him. Her head tilted up, because she barely made five feet. Her face, which wore a ferocious frown, turned bright red. Maybe she disliked dark skin, or maybe she simply hated Aleynis.

“I’m going.” She spat the words, turned, glared at us, and marched down the corridor. I glanced back and noticed her arguing with a Space Force officer. The expression on his face would have curdled milk.

Dad prodded me. “Keth, come on.” He grabbed two data cubes, scanned them, and signed both. The official passed both of them through his reader and put one through a slot. “How old is the boy?”

“I’m fourteen Terran standard years. That makes me sixteen in Aleyni years. The Aleyni year is shorter than ours.”

“You need to consent for yourself.” He passed me a new cube and I signed.

The official threw it away and handed me another. “Read first and then sign.”

I sighed loudly and read the whole thing, both the top half, in Aleyni, and the bottom, in English Common Speech. I started to compare the two, noticing how much clearer informed consent appeared in the Aleyni version, when Dad prodded me. I signed the form and returned the cube to the official. “Okay, I read it.”
The official smiled and pushed it through the slot after Dad’s.

I wasn’t scared, since Dad told me about the need to take a psi exam. The Aleyni checked for any kind of plant or animal, or whether we planned a terrorist attack. Dad said Federation anti-psi fanatics attacked a couple of times recently, so I understood why they checked carefully.

The examiner set me in a chair. He asked me again if I consented to the exam. When I said yes, the examiner put his hands on the sides of my face, looking into my eyes.

His hands burned hot against my skin. A thousand ants chewed through my brain and a voice whispered questions I couldn’t quite make out. I tried to take a breath, but my throat tightened, and I gasped aloud. I squeezed my eyes shut and tried to stop shaking. I shook my head, trying to make the voices go away, and the examiner removed his hands and stared into my eyes for a moment. The buzzing voices stopped, leaving my head feeling as though it would burst open. The examiner smiled at me and passed me through the checkpoint. A couple of minutes went by before my stomach stopped heaving, but hammers still pounded inside my head.

 

 

 

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Interview with Jo Linsdell

Book Cover

Out and About at the Zoo

 

Tell us something about yourself?

I’m originally from the UK but came to Rome, Italy in July 2001 for 3 days and ended up staying. I’ve been happily married to my lovely Italian husband since 2006 and together we have two amazing little boys.

I enjoy experimenting with my writing and trying out new genres. As well as working on my books I also do freelance writing work for clients.

I’m a social media junky. I LOVE it and have profiles everywhere. As a writer I get to combine two of my passions, writing and marketing.

How did you come to write your book?

My 4 years son asked me why I hadn’t written a book for him. I figured he made a good point and so wrote Out and About at the Zoo inspired by the first time I took him to the zoo. I decided to make it rhyming text as that’s his favorite type of book.

You both wrote and illustrated your book. Do you have any training as an artist?

I studied art and design at college and have always loved indulging my creative side. This was my first time using a graphic program though and it was a huge learning curve. I hadn’t taken into account the technical stuff like transparencies, layers, embedding etc… It was fun though and I’m already working on my next children’s picture book.

What tools did you use in creating the art work in your book?

I used Adobe illustrator. I started by drawing to-scale sketches of each page layout and then scanned them into my computer to use as a guide.

Why did you decide to write a book about zoo animals?

My son LOVES animals. When I asked him who he wanted in the story with him he just gave me a list of animals. Using our trip to the zoo seemed like the perfect solution.

How did you pick the animals in your story?

I made a list of all the animals we’d seen during our visit to the zoo and then picked the ones that fitted best with the flow of the story.

How do you feel that living in Italy and knowing Italian has affected you as a writer?

It makes me simplify more.

You have two small children. How do you find time to write?

I write when I can. It’s not easy as I have to grab 5 minutes here and there when I get the chance or stay up late after they’ve gone to bed. One of the great things about Out and About at the Zoo is that it gave me the chance to involve them in my work.

My 4 year old was a great help and not at all shy about giving me his feedback. It was an excellent motivation to get everything finished as he was constantly asking “mum is it finished yet?”

What are you working on now?

I’m working on another rhyming children’s picture about a young fairy called May that dreams of one day becoming a tooth fairy.

I’m also working on a chick-lit and a non-fiction book about social media.

What’s the best writing advice you ever got? The worst?

The best would have to be to believe in myself and not under value my talents. Luckily I haven’t been given any bad advice yet.

Where can readers find your book?

Amazon.com, Amazon.co.uk, Amazon.it and all the other Amazon European sites plus CreateSpace.com

They can also find information about the book and my current promotional tour at my website www.JoLinsdell.com

Tell us something about yourself?
I’m originally from the UK but came to Rome, Italy in July 2001 for 3 days and ended up staying. I’ve been happily married to my lovely Italian husband since 2006 and together we have two amazing little boys.
I enjoy experimenting with my writing and trying out new genres. As well as working on my books I also do freelance writing work for clients.
I’m a social media junky. I LOVE it and have profiles everywhere. As a writer I get to combine two of my passions, writing and marketing.
How did you come to write your book?
My 4 years son asked me why I hadn’t written a book for him. I figured he made a good point and so wrote Out and About at the Zoo inspired by the first time I took him to the zoo. I decided to make it rhyming text as that’s his favorite type of book.
You both wrote and illustrated your book. Do you have any training as an artist?
I studied art and design at college and have always loved indulging my creative side. This was my first time using a graphic program though and it was a huge learning curve. I hadn’t taken into account the technical stuff like transparencies, layers, embedding etc… It was fun though and I’m already working on my next children’s picture book.
What tools did you use in creating the art work in your book?
I used Adobe illustrator. I started by drawing to-scale sketches of each page layout and then scanned them into my computer to use as a guide.
Why did you decide to write a book about zoo animals?
My son LOVES animals. When I asked him who he wanted in the story with him he just gave me a list of animals. Using our trip to the zoo seemed like the perfect solution.
How did you pick the animals in your story?
I made a list of all the animals we’d seen during our visit to the zoo and then picked the ones that fitted best with the flow of the story.
How do you feel that living in Italy and knowing Italian has affected you as a writer?
It makes me simplify more.
You have two small children. How do you find time to write?
I write when I can. It’s not easy as I have to grab 5 minutes here and there when I get the chance or stay up late after they’ve gone to bed. One of the great things about Out and About at the Zoo is that it gave me the chance to involve them in my work.
My 4 year old was a great help and not at all shy about giving me his feedback. It was an excellent motivation to get everything finished as he was constantly asking “mum is it finished yet?”
What are you working on now?
I’m working on another rhyming children’s picture about a young fairy called May that dreams of one day becoming a tooth fairy.
I’m also working on a chick-lit and a non-fiction book about social media.
What’s the best writing advice you ever got? The worst?
The best would have to be to believe in myself and not under value my talents. Luckily I haven’t been given any bad advice yet.
Where can readers find your book?
Amazon.com, Amazon.co.uk, Amazon.it and all the other Amazon European sites plus CreateSpace.com

They can also find information about the book and my current promotional tour at my website www.JoLinsdell.com
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Christmas in July

Christmas tree

Christmas tree (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Beginning on July 9th and extending through July 23rd, MuseItUp Publishing is hosting Christmas in July. All you need to do is visit the participating authors’ blogs and locate the hidden Christmas tree.

English: A Christmas Tree at Home

English: A Christmas Tree at Home (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

https://museituppublishing.com/bookstore2/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=27&Itemid=95

Win free ebooks. Enjoy the thrill of the hunt. Visit MuseItUp publishing on July 9th for the list of links and all the details you will need to participate. Everyone will be a winner.

Check out this story:

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